Authorities believe the remains found in a crashed car are those of Courtney Bryan and her dog.

According to New York Post,

Remains believed to be those of a missing Nevada woman have been found in her crashed car more than a month after she vanished, authorities say.

The suspected remains of Courtney Bryan, 32, and her dog Booch were discovered in her vehicle by a hiker in a steep embankment in Del Norte County, Calif., NBC News reported.

Police said they believe that the woman’s and dog’s deaths resulted from a car accident in an area of Highway 101 prone to crashes.

Cops are awaiting official confirmation on Bryan’s identity from the medical examiner’s office, the outlet reported.

Bryan, who is from Reno, Nev., was reported missing last month when she didn’t return from a visit to the Shasta-Trinity National Forest near Redding, Calif.

Her final Instagram post Sept. 23 showed her enjoying the forest’s Hunt Hot Springs.

Bryan’s family became concerned when she didn’t show up to work Sept. 27 as planned.

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    Judaea Rojo

    Judaea Rojo

    Judaea Rojo attained his Bachelor of Science in Biology, and enjoys hiking, nature photography, and is the Missing NPF Content Manager.

    About Missing NPF

    There is currently no centralized database for those who have gone missing in National Parks and/or Forests at the federal level.

    We have established this listing in an effort to provide a holistic measure of assistance, both to inform future search efforts and to establish an assistive resource for those who are currently living with the loss of a loved one. 

    Missing NPF supports the call for federal agencies to establish, maintain, and share a full listing of those missing in U.S. National Parks and Forests. Meanwhile, we have established our own, and seek your collaboration in providing a meaningfully-detailed source by which to expand public knowledge, identify trends, and empower future search efforts. Join us on this mission.